3.14.2016

DIY Mason Jar Herb Box Garden

Spring has sprung!  Or well it is springing up where I live! I just love the idea of having fresh herbs readily available for cooking up a delicious meal for my family. How about you?  I'm here to show you how you can create your own herb box  garden with interchangeable plants to fit your needs. All  you need is a few supplies and a little bit of time to create something that is just your style!





HERE IS WHAT YOU NEED:
2 MASON JARS
1 SMALL WOODEN CRATE FROM A CRAFT STORE
POTTING SOIL
WOOD STAIN AND RAG
CRAFT PAINT
ROCKS
2 PAINT BRUSH
SANDING BLOCK
FRESH HERBS

 STEP 1:Start by gathering your supplies at a local craft store. They have an abundance of crates of all sizes. Select one small enough to fit a few mason jars. Mine was already pre-stained,but you can find them without stain. For the exact wood crate color pictured, you will need to stain your wooden crate with a stain specifically made for wood in the color ebony. With a dry brush, brush on the stain and with a dry rag wipe off the excess. Let completely dry.

STEP 2: Once the stain is dry to the touch, with another dry bristle paint brush, lightly run the paint brush over the crate creating a distressed effect. I used a sea glass color from Martha Stewart's paint line. Let dry completely, and with your small sanding block, sand places that would have normal wear. For example, the crates edges to give more of a distressed look.

STEP 3: Grab both of your mason jars and add a few medium sized rocks to the bottom for draining. Continue by adding a little bit of potting soil into the jar followed by your small herb plants. Add a little bit more of the potting soil  to top it off.

STEP 4: Add a  some water to your herbs and gently place inside of the crate to complete the look.




Here are some tips for growing ROSEMARY:
Sun: At least 6 hours. Temperature: Average room temperature. Will withstand temperature fluctuation of 45-70°F (7-21°C) in winter. Soil: Well-drained, sandy soil mix. Mix equal parts all-purpose potting mix and sharp sand. Water: Allow top few inches of soil to dry out between waterings then water thoroughly. Rosemary likes to stay on the dry side. Harvest: Once the plant is 6 inches (15 cm) tall, cut stems as needed. New growth will continue forming on the stem. Rosemary grows slowly so don’t harvest more than 1/3 of the plant at one time.

BASIL: Sun: 6-8 hours of bright sunlight a day and benefits from afternoon shade. Soil: Basil likes rich, moist, but well-drained soil  Water: Keep evenly moist. Feed with  every couple of weeks to help keep tender new leaves coming on as you pinch back the stem tips. HARVEST: According to Bonnie Plants, harvest basil leaves by pinching them from the stems anytime after the young plants have reached a height of 6 to 8 inches. Pinch the leaves from the tips of the stems to encourage the plant to branch and make more leaves. Try to keep the stems pinched even if you don’t use the leaves; otherwise, the plant will begin to flower and make seeds, and will stop producing leaves


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